Phonetics, Phonetic Symbols, Phonetic Keyboard

This page provides some information and resources in Phonetics and in the use of the International Phonetics Association alphabet of phonetic symbols for the transcription of speech using computers.


Phonetics

Unicode Phonetic Keyboard and SIL Fonts

The Unicode Phonetic Keyboard is an installable keyboard for Windows PCs that provides a convenient keyboard layout for the word-processing of phonetic transcription using Unicode fonts. The installation package comes complete with two Unicode fonts: Doulos and Charis that have been developed by SIL.

Guide to the use of Unicode Phonetic Symbols

John Wells has written a number of pages which give more information about the set of phonetic symbols available in Unicode, and about how these can be used in Microsoft Word and other applications:

IPA-SAM Phonetic Fonts

The IPA-SAM fonts are a set of TrueType fonts (not Unicode) suitable for Windows and MacOS that include all current IPA symbols. The keyboard layout is designed to be compatible with SAMPA.

Use of Phonetic Symbols

Choice of phonetic symbols for English - John Wells. This is the standard set of phonemic symbols recommended for English (RP and similar accents).

SAMPA is a phonetic transcription coding that uses normal ASCII characters as replacements for IPA symbols. It has been designed for phonemic/broad phonetic transcription of European languages.


Some other pages on our site you may enjoy:

FAROSON - The Auditory Lighthouse

FAROSON is a free program for displaying a real-time scrolling coloured pattern from speech sounds. The aim is to construct a pattern that reflects our subjective sensations of loudness, pitch and timbre. The program may be useful in teaching about the nature of sound sensation. More information.

ESYNTH - Harmonic analysis/synthesis teaching tool

ESynth is a free program designed to explain the harmonic analysis and synthesis of signals. With ESynth you can create signals by adding together individual sinusoidal waveforms (sinewaves) and study the resulting waveform and spectrum. You can also perform an analysis of an input waveform, to see how a given sound can be represented in terms of a sum of sinewaves. More information.