SFS/WASP Version 1.80

Windows Tool for Speech Analysis

WASP is a free program for the recording, display and analysis of speech. With WASP you can record and replay speech signals, save them and reload them from disk, edit annotations, and display spectrograms, pitch marks and a fundamental frequency track.

WASP is a simple application that is complete in itself but which is also designed to be compatible with the Speech Filing System (SFS) tools for speech research.

Read the WASP help file on-line.

You can also try out the web version of WASP.

Latest News

Version 1.80 released June 2020:

Chinese version 1.70 released May 2020:

Version 1.60 released September 2019:

Version 1.54 released July 2013 fixes:

Download and Installation

Download WASP version 1.80. This is a self-installing executable. Just run it to install WASP.

Older versions are available from:

Download the file called wasp1dd.exe into a temporary directory. Then find and run the file to unpack and install.

Want to learn more?

If you find the study of speech interesting, why not visit the Internet Institute of Speech and Hearing at www.speechandhearing.net ? There you will find tutorials, laboratory experiments, reference material, and details of e-mail lists and discussion groups.

Feedback

Please send suggestions for improvements and reports of program faults to sfs@pals.ucl.ac.uk.

Please note that we are unable to provide help with the use of this program.

Copyright

WASP is not public domain software, its intellectual property is owned by Mark Huckvale, University College London. However WASP may be used and copied without charge as long as the program and help file remain unmodified and continue to carry this copyright notice. Please contact the author for other licensing arrangements. WASP carries no warranty of any kind, you use it at your own risk.

Wasp artwork orginally from www.webdog.com.au with thanks.


Some other pages on our site you may enjoy:

CochSim - Cochlear Simulation teaching tool

CochSim is a dynamic simulation of the time and frequency analysis performed by the ear. Sound signals such as sinewaves, pulse trains, sawtooth waves and vowels can be fed into an auditory filterbank and the output monitored in a moving animated display. The program shows the vibration of the oval window and the basilar membrane, the haircell activity against filter frequency and time, and an average excitation pattern across the cochlea. More information.

Web Tutorial on Pitch

A tutorial that provides an extensive introduction to our sensation of the Pitch of sounds. More information.